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  • BUDAI VÍGADÓ CULTURAL CENTER - 2007. - Budapest

    In the end of the 1890s society has grown the desire to revive Buda’s tarnished cultural life and to relieve the building of the Pesti Vígadó by creating a similar cultural space on the right side of the Danube. The building has been built by Sándor Hauszmann between 1897 and 1899 based on the plans of Mór Kallina and Aladár Árkay. It suffered major injuries during the second world war that resulted the loss of its sculptures and its porticus.
    Our primer intention was without question the authentic reconstruction of the original appearance. During our work we could lean on the remaining details of the building, on the original plans and archive photographs. The sculptures and crests were replaced, the façade elements were restored and completed. We rebuilt the porticus, series of round windows as well as the windows and portals on the side of the Corvin square in their original form.
    Despite our task was exclusively to design the façade reconstruction, we dealt with the whole internal reconstruction of the building on a conceptual level. We had to think over the original and the recent functions as well as the utilization of the spaces after a possible future reconstruction. Therefore we had to restore the façade with taking into consideration that the building’s internal reconstruction behind the windows and portals will take place afterwards, according yet unknown plans.

    In case of an internal reconstruction in addition to the functional issues, new demands and regulations arise that has not existed in the original construction era, thus the aforementioned authentic reconstruction principles cannot be followed blindly. The main spaces that represent the value of the building and keep their original use will be handled similarly to the façade reconstruction. However, elements that did not exist in the original construction era shall be realized suitably to the recent demands and solutions. This approach is clearly visible in the yet only virtually presented, sculpture-like info desk that we imagined in the foyer.